ears and cellos

I wrote this a few days before my post on changing strings and before I had uploaded videos of this show at World Cafe Live at the Queen, but I didn’t want to post this until I had uploaded that other content. It is from somewhere around June 13th, 2011 ^_^

You know the bands were too loud last night when your ears are too tired to hear that you’re out of tune during the next day’s lunchtime set ):

Played an awesome Palk Basement Show two Thursdays ago. We (Battleshy Youths) played and also ran sound collaboratively. So. Much. Loudness. Kids drum so hard and we had to push the PA system to match vocals and half stack guitar amplifiers.

It was my first week of work in my new department which meant I was exhausted from adjusting to full time work again. Luckily my supervisor let me go for an extended lunch Friday to play at the World Cafe Live at the Queen Theater in Wilmington with Kelsey on cello. It was so much fun. Videos!

…And I think that is all that I had written >.< It’s nice to have a community of musicians that I can depend on and play shows with and to write music with. So much has changed in the past year.

re-creation

I wrote this post last week but didn’t want to finish it until after my trip updates were posted ^_^

Something my pastor mentioned in passing last Sunday (while wearing my Canada trucker hat during the sermon) is that recreational time is “re-creational.” We need time off to be created new. Time to be refreshed, but also reborn. This road trip was just that for me. It gave me time to focus and de-stress and learn and grow and think and write and pray, away from the distractions of my very small world.

I recently changed the strings on my guitar. For someone playing every single day like I do, this should probably happen once a month, but I do it closer to every 6 or 7 weeks. Anyway, this seems like a simple or menial or annoying task to most people… When I open a pack of strings, I think about the engineer who designed the strings, the metals, the machine to mass produce them. I think about how differently these new strings will sound from my last set, which I lamentably have to toss in the garbage. I think about acoustics and sound waves and bridges and soundboards and the minute changes in tone and timbre these new strings will have and how they will sound the first time I get them in tune; how they will sing with me the next time I take the stage. The guitar is re-created with a new medium for voicing notes and chords. Metal is a good friend. That’s all.